Mobiado Precision Mobile Instruments

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Inside Mobiado

Manufacturing

In 2004, Peter Bonac started the company Mobiado in Vancouver, Canada, with the goal to make a phone that is unique and to use manufacturing techniques, specifically CNC machining to build a superior, quality product. Luxury mobile phones are phones that are built with precision and quality in mind. This is the same technology used for producing precision parts for the aerospace and luxury watch industries; for unbelievable accuracy and allowing for precision of up to 0.001mm.

History

Today Mobiado is the hallmark of some of the most famous mobile phones ever created:

 2004 Professional was the first CNC machined phone to be created from aircraft aluminum.
 2005 Professional EM was the first exotic wood phone to be produced.
 2007 Luminoso was the first phone to use sapphire crystal buttons and the first 3G luxury
    phone.
 2008 Professional 105 GMT was the first mechanical watch phone.
 2009 Grand 350 PRL was the first 3.5G and full keyboard luxury phone and the first phone to
    use mother of pearl.
 2009 Grand 350 Pioneer was the first phone to use meteorite.
 2010 Classic 71 2MG was the first phone to be created from Mokume Gane.
 2010 Classic 712 MG Angular Momentum Edition was the first phone to incorporate Verre
    Èglomisé, as well as the first phone to be sold with matching wristwatch.
 2012 Grand Touch Executive was the first phone to use a SIM card mechanism and the first
     to be created from a stone hybrid material.

 2015 Professional 3 ML was the first luminous phone using Super-Luminova.

Designer

Peter Bonac started every collection with an idea or concept that held true to his vision. His engineering physics degree as well as his four generations of technical family history influenced his design. Using engineering principles such as straight lines, perfectly flat surfaces, and circular buttons, Peter Bonac was able to transform mobile phones into Precision Mobile Instruments. This is the epitome of what he calls “Engineering Art”.